English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

corroborate v.- confirm or give support to (a statement, theory, or finding).

Spanish

corroborar

Etymology

1530s, “to give (legal) confirmation to,” from Latin corroboratus, past participle of corroborare “to strengthen, invigorate,” from com- “together” or “thoroughly” (seecom-) + roborare “to make strong,” from robur, robus “strength

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

privation- n. the loss or lack of the basic things people need to live properly

Spanish

privación

Etymology

mid-14c., “action of depriving,” from Old French privacion and directly from Latin privationem (nominative privatio) “a taking away,” noun of action from past participle stem of privare “deprive” Meaning “want of life’s comforts or of some necessity” is attested from 1790.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

contumely n.

Rudeness or contempt arising from arrogance; insolence.

An insolent or arrogant remark or act.
Spanish
 contumelia

“Why, SHE don’t want him skinned; it would break her heart. Now – “

“Woman, this is perfectly unreasonable. What in the nation DOES she want?”

“Marse Tom, if you would only be a little patient, and not fly off the handle at the least little thing. Why, she only wants you to speak to him.”

“Speak to him! Well, upon my word! All this unseemly rage and row about such a – a – Dorcas, I never saw you carry on like this before. You have alarmed the sentry; he thinks I am being assassinated; he thinks there’s a mutiny, a revolt, an insurrection; he – “

“Marse Tom, you are just putting on; you know it perfectly well; I don’t know what makes you act like that – but you always did, even when you was little, and you can’t get over it, I reckon. Are you over it now, Marse Tom?”

“Oh, well, yes; but it would try anybody to be doing the best he could, offering every kindness he could think of, only to have it rejected with contumely and . . . Oh, well, let it go; it’s no matter – I’ll talk to the doctor. Is that satisfactory, or are you going to break out again?

A Horse’s Tale by Twain, Mark

Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com

English/Spanish/French Cognate of the Day — Cognado del d√≠a

English

rancor n. Рdeep-seated ill will; bitter long-lasting resentment

Spanish

rencor

French 

rancoeur

Etymology

from Latin rancńďre, to stink, be rotten

Some of the very peasants who had been most active in wrangling with him over the hay, some whom he had treated with contumely, and who had tried to cheat him, those very peasants had greeted him goodhumoredly, and evidently had not, were incapable of having any feeling of rancor against him, any regret, any recollection even of having tried to deceive him.

Word Snack

latitudinarian
Having or expressing broad and tolerant views, especially in religious matters.
A person who is broad-minded and tolerant; one who displays freedom in thinking, especially in religious matters.