Everything you think you know about addiction– Ted Talk

Addiction, the society that cultivates it, and how to resolve it.

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Gao-Yu — 71 years old and still fighting the Chinese government. she gives me goosebumps.

This woman will not give up. She is a journalist fighting for what she believes in until the day she dies. And I have to give her the utmost respect for that.

A portrait of Chinese journalist Gao Yu is displayed by a protester in front of the national emblem of China during a demonstration calling for the release of Gao, Hong Kong publisher Yao Wentian and Chinese lawyer Pu Zhiqiang, outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong May 11, 2014. The Chinese government has stepped up pressure on the human rights community ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen crackdown, detaining several leading dissidents and activists, including Pu and Gao. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA - Tags: MEDIA CIVIL UNREST POLITICS) - RTR3OMRN

A portrait of Chinese journalist Gao Yu is displayed by a protester in front of the national emblem of China during a demonstration calling for the release of Gao, Hong Kong publisher Yao Wentian and Chinese lawyer Pu Zhiqiang, outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong May 11, 2014. The Chinese government has stepped up pressure on the human rights community ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen crackdown, detaining several leading dissidents and activists, including Pu and Gao. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu (CHINA – Tags: MEDIA CIVIL UNREST POLITICS) – RTR3OMRN

https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/04/15/dispatches-silencing-veteran-chinese-journalist

http://www.hrw.org/news/2015/06/02/china-end-denial-about-tiananmen-massacre

drugs used as a weapon

A Burmese dealer arranges chunks of jade at a market stall in Mandalay.

There wanton obloquy of people around the world is ubiquitous. At this point, we are forced to focus only on the most extreme human rights violations. But it is important to remember, we all deserve respect, equality, and even assistance. It is troubling to come to terms with the tension resulting from an internal desire to enjoy a blithe existence and the contrition of knowing and not doing.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/02/world/searching-for-burmese-jade-and-finding-misery.html?smid=tw-share#

The Graveyard of Dreams

There are no guarantees that you will show up tomorrow. It’s not an absolute certainty. There are a lot of people who have not made it to today.

So you have to believe that there are no tomorrows. In this world, there are so many reasons to pass off the dreams of today for the more attractive  and alluring prospect of tomorrow. Tomorrow sounds pretty great when you are tired, sore and ready to veg-out. Tomorrow is a great thing to believe in, but you can get easily caught in continuing to dream days ahead without acting in the only moments you only have.

These moments build those dreams. Without them, the dreams will never happen.

“If you want a thing bad enough to go out
and fight for it, 
to work day and night for it, 
to give up your time, your peace and your sleep for it…
if all that you dream and scheme is about it, 
and life seems useless and worthless without it…
if you gladly sweat for it and fret for it and plan for it 
and lose all your terror of the opposition for it…
if you simply go after that thing you want 
with all of your capacity, strength and sagacity, 
faith, hope and confidence and stern pertinacity…
if neither cold, poverty, famine, nor gout,
sickness nor pain, of body and brain, 
can keep you away from the thing that you want…
if dogged and grim you beseech and beset it, 
with the help of God, you will get it!” 

– Les Brown

I’m a dreamer – if you haven’t figured that out by now well…yikes. I love to dream. I love to sketch plans. I love to draw them out on the huge blackboard in my room. I love to try to peer ahead and figure out where I am headed and how to best get there. But I’ve learned one lesson that really put me in my place about a year ago.

You have to earn the right to constantly dream.

Anyone can dream – yes, of course. This is different though. I don’t say earning the right as in you have to be given this ability by someone or something. I say earn the right as in…giving your dreams the respect they deserve. I am convinced that nothing in this world needs more nurturing and protection.

The one thing that perfectly attaches itself to a dream is action. Those are the stepping stones that allow you to earn the right to dream. What I mean is that you have to be fully aware of the fact that if you dream without putting any sort of action behind it, you will singlehandedly destroy those same dreams. Earning the right is about being a man or a woman who can think of a grand idea in which the world can benefit from and then being willing to put it into action. If you haven’t earned the right to constantly dream, you will be living too far forward of this moment and you will waste your life away just as if you were living in the past.

You can make yourself just as miserable dreaming as you can by living in the bad events of the past.

Like I said before, I figured that out last year. I dreamed too much and didn’t act on those same dreams enough. It yielded me nothing but a graveyard of dead and dying dreams…and I promise you, that’s a really tough thing to see.

So dream. But ACT. If you aren’t willing to act, then be prepared to see your dreams sift through your fingers like sand.

There are no tomorrows

– Evan Sanders

The Better Man Project