English/Spanish/French Cognate of the Day — Cognado del día

English

rancor n. – deep-seated ill will; bitter long-lasting resentment

Spanish

rencor

French 

rancoeur

Etymology

from Latin rancēre, to stink, be rotten

Some of the very peasants who had been most active in wrangling with him over the hay, some whom he had treated with contumely, and who had tried to cheat him, those very peasants had greeted him goodhumoredly, and evidently had not, were incapable of having any feeling of rancor against him, any regret, any recollection even of having tried to deceive him.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

transmute v.- to change from one nature, substance, form, or condition into another; transform

Spanish

transmutar

Etymology

transmutation (n.) Look up transmutation at Dictionary.comlate 14c., from Old French transmutacion “transformation, change, metamorphosis” (12c.), from Late Latin transmutationem (nominative transmutatio) “a change, shift,” noun of action from Latin transmutare “change from one condition to another,” from trans- “thoroughly” (see trans-) + mutare “to change” (see mutable). A word from alchemy.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

soporific adj.-  causing sleep

or

something that causes sleep

Spanish

soporífero(a)

Etymology

soporific (adj.) Look up soporific at Dictionary.com“tending to produce sleep,” 1680s, from French soporifique (17c.), formed in French from Latin sopor (genitive soporis) “deep sleep” (see sopor). As a noun from 1722. Earlier as an adjective was soporiferous (1580s as “characterized by excessive sleep,” c.1600 as “soporific”).

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

Tig

English

erudite adj.-  having or showing great knowledge/learning

Spanish

erudito(a)

Etymology

erudite (adj.) Look up erudite at Dictionary.comearly 15c., “learned, well-instructed,” from Latin eruditus “learned, accomplished, well-informed,” past participle of erudire “to educate, teach, instruct, polish,” literally “to bring out of the rough,” from assimilated form of ex- “out” (see ex-) + rudis “unskilled, rough, unlearned” (see rude). Related: Eruditely.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

sepulchral adj.- gloomy/dismal

or

of or relating to a tomb/interment

Spanish

sepulcral

Etymology

sepulchral (adj.) Look up sepulchral at Dictionary.com1610s, “pertaining to a burial or place of burial,” from Latin sepulcralis “of a tomb, sepulchral,” from sepulcrum (see sepulchre) + -al (1). Transferred sense of “gloomy” is from 1711. Related: Sepulchrally.

sepulchre (n.) Look up sepulchre at Dictionary.comalso sepulcher, c.1200, “tomb, burial place,” especially the cave where Jesus was buried outside Jerusalem (Holy Sepulcher or Saint Sepulcher), from Old Frenchsepulcre “tomb; the Holy Sepulchre” (11c.), from Latin sepulcrum “grave, tomb, place where a corpse is buried,” from root of sepelire “to bury, embalm,” originally “to perform rituals on a corpse,” from PIE *sep-el-yo-, suffixed form of root *sep- (2) “to handle (skillfully), to hold (reverently);” cognates: Sanskrit saparyati “honors.” No reason for the -ch- spelling, which dates to 13c. Whited sepulchre “hypocrite” is from Matt. xxiii.27.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

factory

English

obsequious- servile;ingratiating

Spanish

obsequioso

Etymology

late 15c., “prompt to serve,” from Middle French obséquieux (15c.), from Latin obsequiosus “compliant, obedient,” from obsequium “compliance, dutiful service,” fromobsequi “to accommodate oneself to the will of another,” from ob “after” (see ob-) + sequi “to follow” (see sequel). Pejorative sense of “fawning, sycophantic” had emerged by 1590s. Related: Obsequiously; obsequiousness (mid-15c.).

Spanish Association

Sequi- Latin for to follow

Seguir- Spanish for to  follow 

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

Wine_Glass_by_JSovey

English

                                                                                               
                                                                                             desiccate- v.
to dry thoroughly; dry up.
to preserve (food) by removing moisture; dehydrate.
to become thoroughly dried or dried up.
Spanish
desecar
Etymology
from Latin dēsiccāre to dry up, from de- + siccāre to dry, from siccusdry