English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

corroborate v.- confirm or give support to (a statement, theory, or finding).

Spanish

corroborar

Etymology

1530s, “to give (legal) confirmation to,” from Latin corroboratus, past participle of corroborare “to strengthen, invigorate,” from com- “together” or “thoroughly” (seecom-) + roborare “to make strong,” from robur, robus “strength

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

privation- n. the loss or lack of the basic things people need to live properly

Spanish

privación

Etymology

mid-14c., “action of depriving,” from Old French privacion and directly from Latin privationem (nominative privatio) “a taking away,” noun of action from past participle stem of privare “deprive” Meaning “want of life’s comforts or of some necessity” is attested from 1790.

English/Spanish/French Cognate of the Day — Cognado del día

English

rancor n. – deep-seated ill will; bitter long-lasting resentment

Spanish

rencor

French 

rancoeur

Etymology

from Latin rancēre, to stink, be rotten

Some of the very peasants who had been most active in wrangling with him over the hay, some whom he had treated with contumely, and who had tried to cheat him, those very peasants had greeted him goodhumoredly, and evidently had not, were incapable of having any feeling of rancor against him, any regret, any recollection even of having tried to deceive him.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

sedition n. – conduct or language inciting resistance to or rebellion against lawful authority

Spanish

sedición

Etymology

sedition (n.) Look up sedition at Dictionary.commid-14c., “rebellion, uprising, revolt, concerted attempt to overthrow civil authority; violent strife between factions, civil or religious disorder, riot; rebelliousness against authority,” from Old French sedicion (14c., Modern French sédition) and directly from Latin seditionem (nominative seditio) “civil disorder, dissention, strife; rebellion, mutiny,” literally “a going apart, separation,” from se- “apart” (see secret) + itio “a going,” from past participle of ire “to go” (see ion).

Meaning “conduct or language inciting to rebellion against a lawful government” is from 1838. An Old English word for it was folcslite. Less serious than treason, as wanting an overt act, “But it is not essential to the offense of sedition that it threaten the very existence of the state or its authority in its entire extent” [Century Dictionary].

Quote

Most of us now accept as common sense what was once prosecuted as sedition , namely Tom Paine’s proposition that “the idea of hereditary legislators is as absurd as a hereditary mathematician — as absurd as a hereditary poet laureate”.
Geoffrey Robertson, “Dumping our Queen”, TheGuardian , November 6, 1999

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

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English

denigrate v.– to say critical/unfair things about someone; to make something/someone seem less valuable

Spanish

denigrar

Etymology

denigrate (v.) Look up denigrate at Dictionary.com1520s, from Latin denigratus, past participle of denigrare “to blacken, defame,” from de- “completely” (see de-) + nigr-, stem of niger “black” (see Negro). which is of unknown origin. “Apparently disused in 18th c. and revived in 19th c.” [OED]. Related: Denigrated; denigrating.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

arcanum n.- secret/mystery

Spanish

arcano(a)

Etymology

arcane- understood by few/ mysterious or secret

arcana (n.) Look up arcana at Dictionary.com“hidden things, mysteries,” 1590s, a direct adoption of the Latin plural of arcanum “a secret, a mystery,” from neuter of adjective arcanus “secret, hidden, private, concealed” (see arcane). Occasionally mistaken for a singular and pluralized as arcanas because arcana is far more common than arcanum.

English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

imprecation n.– a curse

Spanish

imprecación

Etymology

mid-15c., “a curse, cursing,” from Latin imprecationem (nominative imprecatio), from past participle stem of imprecari “invoke, pray, call down upon,” from assimilated form of in- “into, in, within” (see in- (2)) + precari “to pray, ask, beg, request”