Look It Up: The FDA does not regulate the use of antibiotics in healthy animals

If you look at most of the packaging of meat, mostly poultry, you will find that it says “hormone-free”. However, if you look more closely there is a little star, and it says that the FDA does not allow hormones to be added to chicken anyway. Oh! Well Goody! If you do some research, however, you will find that the FDA suggests the animal agricultural community refrain from feeding livestock grain which is treated with antibiotics to healthy animals for the purpose of promoting growth. See, when the animal is not fighting bacteria, it has more energy to fatten up. So, not only does the food industry get to benefit from fatter chickens, but they also can prevent losing profit when diseases kill off their flock. Another bonus is they can pack the chickens in unsanitary, stressful conditions, and they will still be fat! Anyway, don’t listen to the labeling. Tyson has already been sued for using antibiotics and labeling it antibiotic-free. But who heard about the 5 million dollar settlement which entitled customer that purchased this lie to up to 50 dollars, anyway? For that matter,  don’t take my word for it… Look it up.

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Analysis of Political Rhetoric

The Politics of Writing

I mentioned briefly in my article The Purpose of Writing that people should become familiar with the rhetoric used by politicians and news sources as a defense mechanism. The logic was that if people were able to clearly identify the ways in in which speakers try to sway them, the people would be more critical instead of passive about what they are told. The first way we can analyze this, and probably the easiest way, is to look at your average politician.

For this I’ll take a speech Hillary Clinton made about economic change. I’m only going to do the first ten minutes since the entire thing is nearly an hour, so to follow along you can either watch the first ten minutes and then read the analysis or you can follow along by the time markers I provide.

So following the basic structure of a speech, the first few…

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It was true in 1917, and it is true today– Senator George Norris’ Speech on the economy of war

A short excerpt of Senator George Norris’ speech regarding the economic benefits of WWI to Wall Street.

“To whom does war bring prosperity? Not to the soldier who for the munificent compensation of $16 per month shoulders his musket and goes into the trench, there to shed his blood and to die if necessary; not to the brokenhearted widow who waits for the return of the mangled body of her husband; not to the mother who weeps at the death of her brave boy; not to the little children who shiver with cold; not to the babe who suffers from hunger; nor to the millions of mothers and daughters who carry broken hearts to their graves. War brings no prosperity to the great mass of common and patriotic citizens. It increases the cost of living of those who toil and those who already must strain every effort to keep soul and body together. War brings prosperity to the stock gambler on Wall Street–to those who are already in possession of more wealth than can be realized or enjoyed.

Again this writer says that if we cannot get war, “it is nevertheless good opinion that the preparedness program will compensate in good measure for the loss of the stimulus of actual war.” That is, if we cannot get war, let us go as far in that direction as possible. If we cannot get war, let us cry for additional ships, additional guns, additional munitions, and everything else that will have a tendency to bring us as near as possible to the verge of war. And if war comes, do such men as these shoulder the musket and go into the trenches?

Their object in having war and in preparing for war is to make money. Human suffering and the sacrifice of human life are necessary, but Wall Street considers only the dollars and the cents. The men who do the fighting, the people who make the sacrifices are the ones who will not be counted in the measure of this great prosperity that he depicts. The stockbrokers would not, of course, go to war because the very object they have in bringing on the war is profit, and therefore they must remain in their Wall Street offices in order to share in that great prosperity which they say war will bring. The volunteer officer, even the drafting officer, will not find them. They will be concealed in their palatial offices on Wall Street, sitting behind mahogany desks, covered up with clipped coupons–coupons soiled with the sweat of honest toil, coupons stained with mothers’ tears, coupons dyed in the lifeblood of their fellowmen.

We are taking a step today that is fraught with untold danger. We are going into war upon the command of gold. We are going to run the risk of sacrificing millions of our countrymen’s lives in order that other countrymen may coin their lifeblood into money. And even if we do not cross the Atlantic and go into the trenches, we are going to pile up a debt that the tolling masses that shall come many generations after us will have to pay. Unborn millions will bend their backs in toil in order to pay for the terrible step we are now about to take.

We are about to do the bidding of wealth’s terrible mandate. By our act we will make millions of our countrymen suffer, and the consequences of it may well be that millions of our brethren must shed their lifeblood, millions of brokenhearted women must weep, millions of children must suffer with cold, and millions of babes must die from hunger, and all because we want to preserve the commercial right of American citizens to deliver munitions of war to belligerent nations.”

An… interesting… portion of W.Wilson’s 1917 war speech to Congress.

We have no quarrel with the German people. We have no feeling towards them but one of sympathy and friendship. It was not upon their impulse that their Government acted in entering this war. It was not with their previous knowledge or approval. It was a war determined upon as wars used to be determined upon in the old, unhappy days when peoples were nowhere consulted by their rulers and wars were provoked and waged in the interest of dynasties or of little groups of ambitious men who were accustomed to use their fellow men as pawns and tools. Self-governed nations do not fill their neighbour states with spies or set the course of intrigue to bring about some critical posture of affairs which will give them an opportunity to strike and make conquest. Such designs can be successfully worked out only under cover and where no one has the right to ask questions. Cunningly contrived plans of deception or aggression, carried, it may be, from generation to generation, can be worked out and kept from the light only within the privacy of courts or behind the carefully guarded confidences of a narrow and privileged class. They are happily impossible where public opinion commands and insists upon full information concerning all the nation’s affairs.