English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

effigy 1. a model/sculpture of a person

2.a roughly made model of a person made to be damaged or destroyed to protest or demonstrate anger

Spanish

la efigie

“image of a person,” 1530s, from Middle French effigie (13c.), from Latin effigies “copy or imitation of something, likeness, image, statue,” from or related to effingere “to mold, fashion, portray,” from ex- “out” (see ex-) + fingere “to form, shape” (see fiction). The Latin word was regarded as plural and the -s was lopped off by 18c. Especially figures made of stuffed clothing; the burning or hanging of them is attested by 1670s. Formerly done by judicial authorities as symbolic punishment of criminals who had escaped their jurisdiction; later a popular expression against persons deemed obnoxious

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