English/Spanish Cognate of the Day

English

sedition n. – conduct or language inciting resistance to or rebellion against lawful authority

Spanish

sedición

Etymology

sedition (n.) Look up sedition at Dictionary.commid-14c., “rebellion, uprising, revolt, concerted attempt to overthrow civil authority; violent strife between factions, civil or religious disorder, riot; rebelliousness against authority,” from Old French sedicion (14c., Modern French sédition) and directly from Latin seditionem (nominative seditio) “civil disorder, dissention, strife; rebellion, mutiny,” literally “a going apart, separation,” from se- “apart” (see secret) + itio “a going,” from past participle of ire “to go” (see ion).

Meaning “conduct or language inciting to rebellion against a lawful government” is from 1838. An Old English word for it was folcslite. Less serious than treason, as wanting an overt act, “But it is not essential to the offense of sedition that it threaten the very existence of the state or its authority in its entire extent” [Century Dictionary].

Quote

Most of us now accept as common sense what was once prosecuted as sedition , namely Tom Paine’s proposition that “the idea of hereditary legislators is as absurd as a hereditary mathematician — as absurd as a hereditary poet laureate”.
Geoffrey Robertson, “Dumping our Queen”, TheGuardian , November 6, 1999
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